HIGH SCHOOL
About Us
Administration
Cafeteria
Clubs
Counseling
Curriculum
Business
Career & Technology
English
Textbooks
FACS
Fine Arts
Gifted
Health/PhysEd
Languages
Math
Music
Science
Social Studies
Special Education
Technology
Library
News & Events
PAC
Services
Resources
Staff Directory
Forms & Publications

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION
photo

The Governor Mifflin Technology Education Department has taken the challenge set forth by the "Commission of Excellence" and every valid educational research study. The findings clearly call for students to develop skills in three basic areas. Problem solving, creative thinking, and working with others (teamwork) were found to be the most critical needs for employees to possess. Every curriculum in the Technology Education Program stresses and develops these three areas while relating them to a specific unit of study.

Listed below are all of the technology education classes available to high school students:

Technology Education - Problem Solving (quarter)

This course will build on the technology experiences of the students in 7th and 8th grade. A main focus is to learn how to use a problem solving process and to think more creatively and critically as an individual and in small and large groups. Activities include designing and testing a device to protect a delicate payload, designing a logo to represent a company or product and a manufacturing and production experience that has students work with wood, metal and various specialized tools to produce a product to take home.

Materials and Processes

This is an introductory course open to all students in Grades 9-12 that includes the study of processes, tools, materials, products, occupations and design. This course, following the philosophy of the department, stresses and develops skills in problem solving, creative thinking, and teamwork. Students will explore major areas of materials and processes by using power tools, hand tools and various materials for the purpose of acquiring basic skills. The class is based on a series of required activities or projects that reinforce the information taught in class. Safety and proper operation of power equipment are stressed throughout the course.

Advanced Materials and Processes

This is an advanced course open to students in Grades 10-12 and includes the study of processes, tools, materials, products, occupations and design. This course, following the philosophy of the department, stresses and develops skills in problem solving, creative thinking and teamwork. Students will explore major areas of materials and processes by manipulating power tools, hand tools and various materials for the purpose of acquiring advanced skills including computer aided design and machining. Students will work on a group-manufacturing project in addition to individual projects requiring multiple materials utilization. Safety and proper operation of power equipment are stressed throughout the course. (PREREQUISITES: C or better in Materials and Processes and department approval)

Manufacturing and Construction

This course has a duel focus. The first component of the course will be modeled around forming and running a corporation. Activities would include company formation, product development, financial affairs, marketing, and product manufacturing. Corporate profits will be used for a class trip. The second component of the course centers on construction techniques. Activities would include planning, design, organization and construction with an activity related to community service. (PREREQUISITES: C or better in Materials and Processes and department approval)

Graphic Communications

This course covers pertinent historical processes, as well as emerging technologies in graphic communication. Objectives include bookbinding a portfolio/notebook to act as a chronological record of assignments and progress assessment, screen-printing and the manipulation of Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop and MS Publisher to complete various assignments. The course builds on basic elements of design, color theory, layout and production methods. The elementary principals of process photography are taught and implemented. Photo reproduction is used in lithography and screen-printing. Digital imaging and manipulation are introduced. Such terms as JPEG, TIFF and GIF are introduced. Photographic screen-printing of both photo-direct and indirect methods of printing will be explored. Develop problem solving and a cooperative learning atmosphere.

Contemporary Publishing/Production

Digital Design and desktop publishing are some of the most important skills and trades in society today. Through the use of Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign and Microsoft Word, students will learn to produce computer-generated copies to create a variety of take-home projects such as calendars, posters and brochures.

Web Design and Publishing

The ability to use technology effectively, productively and ethically has become an essential skill in almost every aspect of society, whether at home, at school, at work or at play. Introduction to Web Design using Adobe Dreamweaver® is a valuable teaching tool to help students learn about web design, understand the fundamental principles for creating and maintaining web pages and practice creating web sites. Knowledge of Photoshop and InDesign is useful but not required. Students will need to supply a 2GB flash drive.

Drafting 1

Drafting 1 covers the basic graphic practices that the industry uses in the manufacturing process. Topics include lettering, geometric construction, multiview drawing, dimensioning, sectional and auxiliary views and printmaking. Approximately 70% of coursework is performed using the AutoCAD program. Drafting provides a valuable experience for those engaged in a shop program or for students interested in an industrial career.

Drafting 2

As an extension of Drafting 1, students explore more complex industrial graphics. Course topics, as time permits, include assembly and detail drawings, intersections and developments. Approximately 90% of coursework is computer-aided drafting (CAD). (PREREQUISITE: Drafting 1)

Drafting 3 and 4

Following an introduction of fundamental building practices and a room-by-room study of good residential planning, students develop a set of working drawings for a home of their choice. Personal copies of contemporary literature drawings include floor and basement plans, elevations, sections, plot plan and, as time permits, detail sheets. Architectural blueprint reading problems are assigned on a homework basis. Students learn several principles of energy-efficient design. 90-100% of the coursework is CAD. (DRAFTING 3 AND 4 PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of any two drafting courses)

Engineering/Design Systems 1

Topics presented in this pre-engineering, design and problem solving course include: basic robotics, transportation systems, electronics, alternative energy problem solving process and effective project planning and documentation. Students work individually, with a partner and collaboratively in small groups as they develop solutions to the problems presented. Practical applications of computers, lasers and other technological tools and devices is a focus of the experience. The course is designed to be taught through an investigative "design and construct," problem solving approach in a lab equipped with modern technological tools and devices. This is a .5 credit course that meets three times a cycle for the whole school year.

Engineering/Design Systems 2

This course is a continuation of the first level course. Students will be presented with technical problems with topics such as electronics, robotics, LEGO Mindstorms, computer programmed robot systems and advanced graphic communication and packaging design. (PREREQUISITE: C or better Engineering/Design Systems 1)

Power Technology

This course examines a wide variety of power development, conversion and usage devices. Initially, the class explores the history of power and conducts experiments and projects with power sources from ancient times up to today, including wind, water, steam, internal combustion, solar and nuclear systems. In the latter part of the course, an emphasis is placed on electrical devices, with projects including power supplies, analog and digital circuits, amplifiers, speaker/transducer systems and two-way radio systems. Work is done in both AC and DC systems, and the area of home wiring is also explored. Student work in this area centers on research and experimentation, utilizing common testing and construction tools. (PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Algebra 1)

 
 
Governor Mifflin Middle School MR. JOHN ALTHOUSE, principal
 
  home | viewing recommendations | disclaimer | credits | contact  
 

copyright © 2014 GMSD. All rights reserved.